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Architectural terms, their definitions in English and their translations

There are 321 entries in this glossary.
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Term Definition
Ear

Ear (ed) Also called Elbow, Lug(ged) Also called Croset / Crossette Also called Shoulder Also called Knee Architecture

A projection at the corner of an architrave of a door or window; any small projecting member or part of a piece or structure, either decorative or structural

Found especially on doors, windows and chimney pieces

Found in Classical Greek and Roman architecture and derivatives, including Beaux Arts Classicism, Classical Revival, Federal, Georgian Revival, Greek Revival, Neoclassicism, Renaissance Revival, Second Empire.

Eastlake Style

Origin

To some historians, the Eastlake Style was simply a decorative style of ornamentation found on houses of various other Victorian styles, primarily the Queen Anne and Stick styles.Eastlake is named after Charles L. Eastlake (1833-1906), an English architect who wrote Hints on Household Taste in Furniture, Upholstery, and Other Details, published in 1868. The book was reprinted in America in 1872 and became so popular that it required six editions within eleven years.

Eaves

That part of a sloping roof that overhangs the wall. Slight eave overhangs, boxed with modillions, dentils, or classical moldings, are found in Colonial Revival, Neoclassical, Beaux Arts Classical, Federal, Georgian Revival, Classical Revival, Italian Renaissance Revival styles. Slight eave overhangs, open, not boxed, are found in Stick and Gothic Revival styles

Slight eave overhangs, with brackets, are found in Second Empire, Italianate styles

Slight eave overhangs, with wide band of trim below, are found in Greek Revival style

Wide eave overhangs, boxed without brackets, are found in the Prairie style

Wide eave overhangs, boxed with brackets, are found in Italianate, Italian Renaissance Revival, Prairie styles

Wide eave overhangs, open, not boxed, are found in Arts & Crafts style

Flared eaves are found in Prairie, Stick, Arts & Crafts styles

Ecole Nationale Supérieure des Beaux-art

The school that taught the Beaux-Arts style of architecture in the late 19th century Very influential in the US in that many of the leading late 19th century architects had been trained at L'Ecole. Richard Morris Hunt (1827-95) was the first American to study there and became the leading exponent in the U.S. of the Beaux-Arts style. It includes departments of painting, graphic arts, and sculpture and is free to artists whose previous training enables them to pass the entrance examinations.

Egg-and-dart

A decorative molding carved with a series of rounded ovals and arrowheads

"The 'egg and dart' and 'egg and leaf' mouldings are derived from an Egyptian lotus border" - Egyptian Origin of the Ionic Capital and of the Anthemion, by W. H. Goodyear © 1887

In the egg-and-anchor, egg-and-arrow, and egg-and-tongue moldings, the arrowhead ornament is varied in form

Found in classical Greek and Roman architecture and derivatives, including Beaux Arts Classicism, Federal, Georgian Revival, Greek Revival, Neoclassicism, Renaissance Revival, Second Empire

Egyptian cornice

Also called:

Egyptian gorge Cavetto cornice, a type of Gorge-and-roll cornice Gorge cornice

The characteristic cornice of most Egyptian buildings, consisting of a large cavetto molding decorated with vertical leaves, and a torus molding below

Molding

elliptical arch

Also called basket arch, semielliptical arch. A flattened arch designed by joining a quarter circle to each end of a false ellipse

Found in Beaux-Arts, Chateauesque, and Italianate styles

Emergent

Adjective E·MER·GENT/IˈMƏRJƏNT/. Adjective. In the process of coming into being or becoming prominent. Noun. An emergent property.

Emergent Territories

Adjective Emergent Territories. Working beyond the conventional scales of territorial design, town planning, building or fabrication in designing a multi-scalar habitat. ORIGIN: Institute for Advanced Architecture of Catalonia (IAAC) – Definition: Emergent Territories. Working beyond the conventional scales of territorial design, town planning, building or fabrication in designing a multi-scale habitat. As in the design of ecosystems, each level has its own rules of interaction and relation,and at the same time must comply with certain parameters that pertain to the system as a whole. The Emergent Territories group works on projects that range in scale from the territory to the neighborhood. The idea of Emergent Territories is related to two issues: On the one hand, the IaaC is interested in understanding those countries and cities around the world with emerging economies and cultures that, by virtue of their regional or economic position, can contribute value to the planet as a whole. In recent years we have studied Brazil, Croatia, Taiwan, Romania, Colombia and Tunisia, or in the near future will be studying India and the countries of North Africa, the Persian Gulf and Sub-Saharan Africa.The work done in these countries seeks to identify the particular urban and territorial values of these places in order to construct more intelligent territories anywhere in the world, moving on from the Western idea that there is a single model of city (be it European or American) to work on the basis of more complex and more open values. The other issue related to emergent territories has to do with the creation of intelligent territories that function in a multi-scalar way, in order that the relationship between natures, networks and nodes can foment the ‘emergence’ of an urban intelligence. To this end we are interested in pursuing what we call ‘Hyperhabitat’ research as a process of developing a general theory of the multi-scalar habitat that can be applied anywhere in the world and at any scale, as a basis for the construction of complete complex ecosystems. This group also focuses on Barcelona as a site for ongoing urban experimentation, with a view to contributing to the discussions and reflections in relation to the urban progress of the city. Areas of research: • Emergent Territories • Hyperhabitat • Research Trips • Barcelona-Metapolis

Enamel

Noun Enamel. A siliceous substance made from a mixture of feldspar, quartz, carbonate and sodium chloride. Used to decorate ceramics and metals. Metals may be decorated using the cloisonné technique whereby the paste is set into small mountings created by metal thread, or using the champlevé technique, where the paste is set into dents made by a punch on the surface of the metal.

Encrustation

A decorative technique in which a contrasting material is applied to a surface as an inlay or overlay

Engaged

Architecture

Attached to a wall by being partly embedded or bonded to it

Engaged column: A column partially attached to a wall and projecing from 1/3 to 3/4 of the extent of its diameter

Found in almost all styles of architecture

Furniture Engaged column: A column partially attached to a wall and projecing from 1/3 to 3/4 of the extent of its diameter

Entablature

In classical architecture, the top of an Order, horizontally divided into cornice, frieze, and architrave, supported by a colonnade

Found in the Doric, Ionic, Corinthian, Composite, and Tuscan orders

Found in classical Greek and Roman architecture and derivatives, including Beaux Arts Classicism, Classical Revival, Federal, Georgian Revival, Greek Revival, Neoclassicism, Renaissance Revival, Second Empire

Ephebeum

Noun Ephebeum – large hall in the ancient Palaestra furnished with seats, the length of which should be a third larger than the width. It served for the exercises of youths of from sixteen to eighteen years of age.

Epinaos

Noun Epinaos – open vestibule behind the nave. The term is not found in any classic author, but is a modern coinage, originating in Germany, to differentiate the feature from the opisthodomos, which in the Parthenon was an enclosed chamber.

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